February 29, 2012

February 29, 2012
Leap Day


Welcome to another day in my life. Today is Wednesday and we have almost made it through the middle of another work week. It is also February 29th which is the extra day we get every fourth year for leap year. I hope you have been having a safe and great week so far. It has been a very busy week for Dab the AIDS Bear and me.

So what and why do we have an extra day for leap year? I wondered this myself so I decided to write my blog for today about the issue.

A leap year (or intercalary or bissextile year) is a year containing one additional day (or, in the case of lunisolar calendars, a month) in order to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, a calendar that had the same number of days in each year would, over time, drift with respect to the event it was supposed to track. By occasionally inserting (or intercalating) an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

For example, in the Gregorian calendar (a common solar calendar), February in a leap year has 29 days instead of the usual 28, so the year lasts 366 days instead of the usual 365. Similarly, in the Hebrew calendar (a lunisolar calendar), a 13th lunar month is added seven times every 19 years to the twelve lunar months in its common years to keep its calendar year from drifting through the seasons too rapidly.

In the Gregorian calendar, the current standard calendar in most of the world, most years that are evenly divisible by 4 are leap years. In each leap year, the month of February has 29 days instead of 28. Adding an extra day to the calendar every four years compensates for the fact that a period of 365 days is shorter than a solar year by almost 6 hours.

February 29 is a date that usually occurs every four years, and is called leap day. This day is added to the calendar in leap years as a corrective measure, because the earth does not orbit around the sun in precisely 365 days.

So now you know the rest of the story! Enjoy your extra day this year and do something special for yourself.

Have a great leap day!

Until we meet again; here's wishing you health, hope, happiness and just enough.

big bear hug,



Daddy Dab