January 30, 2011

January 30, 2011


Emergency ADAP Summit


Welcome to another day in my life. Today is Sunday and the last day of the Emergency ADAP Summit in Fort Lauderdale Beach, Florida. So it has been a very busy weekend for Dab the AIDS Bear and me.

I read a very interesting article about a new technique which renders T-Cells resistant to HIV. So I thought I would share the information with you today:

An international team of researchers has found a new technique that is capable of making T-cells resistant to HIV in such a way that it does not place harm on the T-cells' activity or growth.

Research for this study was conducted by Hideto Chono, study leader and creator of the new gene therapy tool, along with co-authors from Takara Bio Inc. in Otsu, Shiga, Japan; National Institute of Biomedical Innovation; Seoul National University and ViroMed Co. in Seoul, Korea, and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in Piscataway, New Jersey.

To make this anti-HIV gene therapy technique, Chono and the team of researchers used a bacterial gene called mazF, which is an enzyme, or mRNA interferase, that prevents protein synthesis by destroying gene transcripts. MazF is transferred into CD4+ T-cells, and due to the design of the mazF gene therapy vector, HIV activates synthesis of the MazF protein. MazF blocks HIV replication when HIV infects these treated T-lymphocytes, which ultimately makes the T-cells resistant to the infection.

"The potential of using vectors to express genes within a cell to block viral infection was first considered by David Baltimore in a strategy called 'intracellular immunization,'" said James M. Wilson, MD, Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief, and Director of the Gene Therapy Program at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine's Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. "This study illustrates a unique way in which intracellular immunization can be achieved."

This study, titled "Acquisition of HIV-1 Resistance in T Lymphocytes Using an ACA-Specific E. coli mRNA Interferase," was published in Human Gene Therapy.

So there continues to be more and more hope we will one day have a cure for the HIV virus. I just hope I am still here when they find it.

Until we meet again; here's wishing you health, hope, happiness and just enough.



big bear hug,



Daddy Dab