May 23, 2011

May 23, 2011
May 21 Doomsday Prediction Fails


Welcome to another day in my life. Today is Monday and we are still here despite the prediction for May 21, 2011 being the rapture. Guess we all have to start another work week. Oh well, I hope you had a safe and great weekend. It was another busy one for Dab the AIDS Bear and me.

Last evening, Dab the AIDS Bear and I spoke at Georgi's Alibis for Beacons Against Bullying: A Candlelight Vigil. Unless you have been hiding somewhere, you have read in my blogs or seen on social networks or the internet about the large number of gay teen suicides the past several months. Since I was outed and bullied in high school, I am very passionate about the issue besides my work with HIV and AIDS. So I was honored to be asked to speak at the rally.

Speaking about the rapture, are you relieved or disappointed? Doomsday came and went without a peep, as May 21 failed to bring about earthquakes, a rapture or the mass excavation of all the world's dead.

The rumor that May 21 would kick off the end of the world was started and propagated by Harold Camping, the president of the Oakland, Calif.-based Christian radio broadcasting network Family Radio. Camping, who also made a failed doomsday prediction in 1994, had claimed that his mathematical interpretation of the Bible pointed to May 21 as the day of the rapture. Earthquakes were supposed to shake the globe, throwing the dead from their graves as believers' souls ascended to heaven. Five months later, on Oct. 21, 2011, the universe was supposed to end.

Camping has not commented publicly on the failed prediction.

Camping is far from the first doomsayer to falsely predict the end of the world. In fact, doomsday experts say that a belief in the end is comforting to some people who see the world as irredeemably evil.

Even centuries of failed predictions can't convince believers that the end is not near, according to Lorenzo DiTommaso, a religion professor at Concordia University in Montreal. Religious doom predictors see their sacred texts as infallible, DiTommaso said, so any failed predictions are mistakes of interpretation and the next interpretation could always be right.

So gear up for 2012, everyone. We heard the Mayan calendar is ending, and it is sure to be a wild ride.

Until we meet again; here's wishing you health, hope, happiness and just enough.



big bear hug,





Daddy Dab